"'The hungry sheep look up and are not fed': the shepherds are all at a conference!" But sometimes conferences can actually be helpful; and with its modern facilities in a scholarly environment Campion Hall in Oxford is showing itself suitable and successful in hosting small select conferences. For instance, in February 2014 fourteen Jesuit Superiors of the Provinces of Western Europe gathered under the direction of the Jesuit General’s Assistant for that region, and discussed common policy topics for a few days.

Supporting Campion Hall

Campion Hall is a ministry of the Jesuits in Britain as a registered charity number 230165 (Trustees for Roman Catholic Purposes Registered). As a Permanent Private Hall of Oxford University, Campion Hall does not receive any public funding from the Government, nor from any other source. It relies totally on private financial support to meet its costs and activities.

The Hall warmly welcomes all financial donations from individuals as well as institutions
to promote its work.

Financial support can take the form of

University Praise for the Hall

"The committee was most impressed by the quality of the Hall's students, by its scholarly purposefulness and positive approach. Albeit on a small scale and notwithstanding its single-sex status, Campion Hall seemed to the Committee to provide an exemplar of how an academic community should operate. The high standard of its community based academic life, and the central place of an egalitarian ethos supporting academic endeavour were confirmed by all those whom the Committee met.".

Looking Ahead: Michaelmas Term 2014

This term look out for the Seminar with economic and financial institutions which will be led by Professor Gael Giraud, SJ, the award-winning French economist, that Campion is planning with the Las Casas Institute, Blackfriars. The subject will be Thomas Picketty's recent work, Capital in the Twenty first Century, which has aroused great interest and varied comments.

Campion Conferences: Michaelmas Term 2014

During last term the Hall was pleased to be involved in several conferences on specialised and topical subjects, which well illustrated our commitment to academic engagement with social and cultural questions. These included: an international seminar on Parenthood, Population and Family Planning; and regular meetings of the Jesuit Institute of Education series for teachers in Jesuit UK schools.

A fond farewell

When the first Principal of Heythrop College, University of London, Professor F. C. Copleston, SJ, was retiring, an unfortunate choice was made of the final hymn at the College Eucharist marking his departure: "Tarry no longer. Toward thine heritage haste on thy way, and be of right good cheer." This breezy valediction was fortunately not delivered to Fr Brendan Callaghan SJ as he retired recently from Campion Hall as Master.

The Origins of Campion Hall

When the Jesuits opened a Roman Catholic Hall in Oxford University and for a time named it "Pope's Hall", they may well have seemed to be acting defiantly and provocatively. The explanation is more innocent, however. Oxford Private Halls were initially called after their Master, so what is now known as Campion Hall was for a time named after its then Master, one Thomas O'Fallon Pope, SJ. That was but one stage in an interesting history of Campion Hall.

Campion News - Trinity Term 2014

Welcome to Campion News, our regular newsletter beginning with this issue. In the past we have produced an occasional newsletter, but we plan to publish this one regularly, at the start of each term. We feel we have much to share with our friends, both old and hopefully new. We want to keep you informed about who we are at Campion Hall, what is happening here, and what we are achieving and aiming to achieve. We hope that reading about all this will prove interesting and enjoyable to our readers.

Cultural Anthropology

By: Rev'd Gerry A. Arbuckle, SM

Before I describe my work at Campion Hall this year let me briefly explain the nature of cultural anthropology. Anthropology is about how people feel and communicate with one another and across cultures. It is often about revealing the cultural forces that motivate people and their institutions, although they are commonly unaware of the existence of these forces and their ability to control behavior.


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