nicholas.king

Rev'd Nick
King, SJ
Tutor and Fellow in New Testament Studies
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Rev'd Nick King, SJ is a Jesuit of the British Province. He was educated at Stonyhurst, and then read Greats (“Classics”) at St John’s College, Oxford, after which he entered the Society of Jesus. He did Philosophy and Theology at Heythrop College in the University of London, then taught for a very happy year at St Ignatius’ College, Enfield. After that he returned to Oxford to do an MPhil in Early Judaism at the Oriental Institute, Oxford. Then he was ordained and taught for two years at Heythrop (1980-1982), and two years at St Aloysius College, Glasgow. Then he did his Jesuit tertianship in Spokane, Washington State. After that he taught at Stonyhurst for four years. He then went to South Africa and taught New Testament (and even some Moral Philosophy) in various seminaries and universities. When he arrived, grand apartheid was still on; and one of the greatest days of his life was in April 1994, when he was a District Observer for the first democratic elections in that country, so that he had seven polling stations to visit and pretend to a largely fictitious knowledge of South African electoral law. He returned to the United Kingdom in 2001, ostensibly for three years, but has been teaching New Testament and related languages at Campion Hall ever since.

He has recently returned from three years away, teaching at Boston College, St Mary’s Twickenham, and Heythrop College. While he was at Campion Hall before, he published a translation, first of the Greek New Testament, and then of the LXX (=Greek Bible). Since that all appeared, he has produced three more books, all published by Kevin Mayhew:

 

The Helplessness of God (on exercising authority in the Church)

Pictures of the Early Church (an Introduction to the New Testament)

The Scandal of Christian Disunion (a biblical look at division in the Church)

 

He is currently working on a text-book for the new scripture component of A-level religious studies and on a short book on the Lord’s Prayer for “conversations for the Common Good”.